Is FreeLotto a Scam?

Google “FreeLotto and scam” and you’ll find plenty of results challenging the legitimacy of the service and detailing customer complaints.

It certainly does seem too good to be true. After all, playing a game of chance where you can win real money for free does seem like it should come with a catch.

Well, there is no catch. It is a legitimate service and company, and after reading this you’ll understand how it all works – and makes sense.

Prevent yourself from becoming a victim of a scam: FreeLotto will never ask you for money before sending you your winnings. If someone does, he or she is a scam artist. Hang up the phone and don’t reply to emails or texts. If you think you are a FreeLotto winner, check out this page and click the first FAQ

U.S.-Based Company is owned by PlasmaNet Inc., a U.S.-based company with headquarters in midtown Manhattan. It has millions of members, generates revenue, pays taxes and is governed by all the applicable federal and state laws, statutes and regulations related to this industry. offers its members an opportunity to play a game of chance for free and has been doing so for more than 15 years.


Principles Behind Every Sweepstakes

The basic principles behind FreeLotto’s games are the same as every other sweepstakes, and works just like those run by countries, states, multinational companies and local religious organizations.

It is a game of chance where the odds increase with the size of the winnings.

As is true for any legitimate sweepstakes, do you have a chance to win? Absolutely. Are the odds long? Absolutely. But there are people who win – just ask one of our 21 millionaires!

Here’s a list of recent winners.

In fact the odds of winning FreeLotto are similar to any sweepstakes with similar size prizes and numbers to match. The math works out the same.


What About Those Online Complaints?

There are 2 primary responses to those complaints.

But first, please understand that we take every legitimate complaint seriously and try to resolve each one fairly. So if you have a real complaint, contact us.

Now to the primary responses.

1. Unscrupulous Con Artists

Unfortunately, part of living in a free society includes having to deal with frauds, scammers, and con artists, as anyone knows who has dealt with:

  • The Nigerian Letter/Email scam where the scammers send you an email and offer you a share in a large sum of money if you transfer a small amount to them first
  • Telemarketing Fraud where a caller tries to trick you into giving up your bank information for a free gift
  • Identity Theft where scammers use your identity to rack up credit card debit
  • Ponzi Schemes where an organization pays returns to its investors from new capital paid to the operators by new investors, rather than from profit earned by the organization

Scammers also pretend to represent FreeLotto and attempt to defraud people who then believe FreeLotto is to blame.

Are a good percentage of online complaints about FreeLotto the result of scammers? Yes. And we try to warn everyone about it as much as possible. In fact if you do Google “FreeLotto Scam,” you’ll see our warning tops the results page.

FreeLotto’s Scam Warning Page

We even built a website called to help raise awareness of the scammers.

But clearly not all complaints are about scammers.

2. Legitimate Customer Complaints

Unfortunately, not every customer is a happy customer at any company in any industry.

As hard as we try, sometimes it’s not enough. Sometimes there’s a misunderstanding. And sometimes, some people just aren’t satisfied.

And that’s common for any organization.

Let’s look at

Search FreeLotto and you’ll find us there with a 2.2 rating and around 170 complaints.

FreeLotto page

Now search for the major U.S. department store Macy’s. Its rating is a 2.1 with more than 670 complaints.

Macy’s page

How about the gold standard of customer satisfaction Apple? Its rating is a 2.2 with 160 complaints and counting.

Apple’s page

You get the point.

Having angry customers does not mean the company is running a scam. It means the company is running a business with lots of customers.

The question is percentage.

We literally have tens of millions of players.

If FreeLotto were a scam, would we really be able to fool so many people for so long? No.

So, in the end, if you enjoy playing sweepstakes, play FreeLotto. Have fun. And who knows, you could become rich! After all, we’ve awarded over $100 million in cash and prizes, and we’re not finished yet!

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This story was written by Michael Smith